How do 1300 numbers work

On this theme of 1300 numbers, I just wanted to put a little more information out there to answer the question on how 1300 number and 1800 numbers work.

Unfortunately, it’s not such a simple answer, we will need to discuss the basics of how the telephone network works in order to answer it.

First, lets discuss the telephone network. When you lift your handset and enter the number you want to dial, or push dial on your mobile, the system on the other end received this command.

This system looks through a big list of destination information and finds out where it should send the call, a bit like the postal system. If a call matches a local record, it connects the call locally.

If the call matches a remote destination or mobile telephone, the call is routed to another system closer to the destination. It is possible that the call may have to go through a whole series of destinations on it’s way to the final destination.

Now how does this relate to 1300 numbers? Well they are handled in the same way. 1300 numbers and 1800 numbers don’t belong to a specific address (like a fixed line) or to a sim card (like a mobile). They only exist on the network and thus have to have a destination or answer point configured. When a call is received at the exchange or mobile tower, the system will do a look up request to the carrier of that service and find out the relevant destination for the call.

Keep in mind this destination can vary based on caller type, time based routing, state/region/exchange based routing and even overflow routing. Once the destination has been confirmed the call is routed as per normal.

So that’s the basics of how 1300 numbers and 1800 numbers work.